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Sarah Everard: Met Police officer removed from duties after ‘inappropriate graphic’ shared during search operation


A probationary Metropolitan Police officer involved in the Sarah Everard search
operation in Kent has been removed from their duties after allegedly sharing an “inappropriate graphic” with colleagues.

The force said a graphic was shared via social media on Friday and was reported by a number of officers “who were concerned by its content”.

The probationary police constable, who had been deployed as a cordon officer during the search operation in relation to Ms Everard’s murder, has now been placed in a non-public facing role while enquiries continue, according to the Met.

The matter has been referred to the police watchdog, the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC).

The Metropolitan Police said the matrix was created to highlight possible gaps in activity or intelligence
Image:
The matter has been referred by Scotland Yard to the police watchdog

The Met said the graphic does not contain photographic images, no images of Ms Everard, nor any other material obtained from or related to the investigation into her murder.

Ms Everard’s family has been made aware of the incident.

Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave said: “The MPS expects its officers to behave professionally at all times and this includes how they use social media.

“I take allegations that any officer or officers have failed to observe these standards very seriously and have referred this matter to the IOPC.”

Police officers investigating Ms Everard’s death have been combing a supermarket car park in Sandwich, Kent.

And specialist divers have been seen preparing to search part of the River Stour which runs through the town.

Ms Everard, 33, went missing while walking home from a friend’s house in south London on 3 March.

Human remains were found on 10 March in an area of woodland near Ashford, Kent, which were subsequently identified as Ms Everard’s.

Serving police officer Wayne Couzens, 48, has been charged with the marketing executive’s kidnap and murder.



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